Monday, February 27, 2012...11:33 am

Comic books and Hollywood promote illiteracy #1: Iron Man

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Marvel Studios may have spent around $140,000,000 to put Iron Man on the screen, but none of that money seems to have gone on proofreading.

As Iron Man seems to be showing pretty much on a loop on Film 4 at the moment, sub-editing geeks can check out the montage of magazine covers featuring millionaire businessman/inventor Tony Stark during the awards ceremony a little way into the movie.

Oops – that Forbes cover makes the reins/reigns subbing blooper that longstanding readers of this very blog were warned about back in 2008. It just goes to show that you can never spend too much time honing your accuracy (or reading Freelance Unbound).

So – you may be a terrific movie director, Jon Favreau, but be aware you are corrupting the youth of the western world with your sloppy proofreading…

4 Comments

  • This is what often happens when graphic designers mock-up magazines and newspapers for use in films and TV. Inability to spell (or, in this case, to know which of various possible spellings is the correct one) seems to be a prerequisite for visually-orientated work.

    I’m not just taking a swipe here, I think the work involves a different part of the brain, which is why designers can work with the radio on and writers can’t (OK, I expect there are radio-loving writers who will now disagree…)

  • Yes – I’ve notice this before too. I can’t function as a writer or sub with external sound, but layout seems to lend itself to background music, or radio.

    As for designers and their inability to spell – I’ve often wondered if it’s a dyslexic thing peculiar to people with more visual design skills…

  • I will third that, I have never worked with a designer who can spell. The most annoying part is when they insist that its copy and that someone else should write it, really they should have a basic gasp and I am taking a swipe here!

  • I expect that cover was seen and passed by at least six people. Probably more.

    It ain’t just designers. It’s everyone. The fabric of modern life is steeped in illiteracy.

    Fortunately, since everyone’s illiterate nobody notices. Or cares.